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Hoss Technical Gear clothes for your commute

by Commute by Bike

Hoss Technical Gear started a couple years back with the goal of making comfortable, functional and affordable clothes for mountain bikers. Instead of creating jerseys that were tight and showed off all the wrong things, they launched with wicking jerseys and T’s that were loose and comfortable to wear but also kept you cool and dry while riding.

They also started out with their Ponderosa shorts which I still wear on all my offroad rides. Baggy shorts with plenty of pockets on the outside and comfortable spandex inside with enough chamois to keep me safe and comfortable.

Although they started with the target of mountain bikers, they are expanding their line to make my urban riding better as well. Here’s a rundown of their offerings:

Pony Polo Shirt

The Pony Polo shirts are available in both short and long sleeve versions. I immediately liked these for my commute. The collar looks great and gives a bit more “dressy” feel when I’m meeting someone without having to change once I arrive. The wicking material gives the quick dry effect that also helps in that area.

Long Sleeved Pony Polo – $34.95
Short Sleeved Pony Polo – $29.95

Hoss Technical Gear Commuting Urban Biking Hoss Technical Gear Pony Polo Shirt Commuting Urban Biking Hoss Technical Gear Pony Polo Shirt Commuting Urban Biking

Scout Windbreaker

The Scout Windbreaker is a top notch jacket and is the best piece of commuter gear currently in the Hoss lineup.

The Scout does all the things you would expect from a windbreaker of shedding the rain and keeping you warmer on the cold days. But it’s also built specifically for the bike rider:

  • Reflective trim on the back of the arms and the rear flap
  • Back of jacket extends down far enough to keep your butt dry
  • Plenty of room for storing stuff with two front pockets and a big rear pocket
  • Neck drawstring

Also, if you’re into the vest thing, the arms of the jacket zip off.

The one issue I have with the Scout is the sleeve length. Off the bike it’s fine, but on the bike they ride up a couple inches which is annoying when it’s cold or rainy. This is pretty normal with jackets, but I’d like to see something on a bike specific windbreaker that solves this problem. Update: I’ve heard from the Hoss MTB folks and they plan on fixing this problem in future runs of the Scout.

Scout Windbreaker – $70

Hoss Technical Gear Scout Windbreaker Commuting Urban Biking Hoss Technical Gear Scout Windbreaker Commuting Urban Biking Hoss Technical Gear Scout Windbreaker Commuting Urban Biking Hoss Technical Gear Scout Windbreaker Commuting Urban Biking

Ponderosa Knickers

I’m a fan of knickers. Keeps you warmer than shorts without getting sucked into the drivetrain of your bike.

The Ponderosa Knickers are a more technical take on the 3/4 length design than the Chrome Shins Knickers I reviewed before. The inner liner is a full 6-panel spandex shorts with ample Chamois to keep you comfortable.

These knickers also sport six pockets to carry anything you need, including 2 side cargo pockets and a rear cargo style pocket with Velcro closures. The elastic waistband is comfortable and stays in place without riding down. And there’s elastic pulls on the bottom of the legs that you can tighten to keep dry.

I’ve found that the Ponderosa Knickers are great for longer rides where the spandex with Chamois gives you the extra level of comfort, however I don’t like working in them all day. Hanging out in the spandex liner gets uncomfortable after a few hours and I’m itching to get out of them.

I’d recommend the Ponderosa Knickers if you’re looking for added comfort on your commute and if you’ll be changing out of them once you reach the office.

Ponderosa Knickers – MSRP $69.95

Hoss Technical Gear Ponderosa Knickers Commuting Urban Biking Hoss Technical Gear Ponderosa Knickers Commuting Urban Biking Hoss Technical Gear Ponderosa Knickers Commuting Urban Biking Hoss Technical Gear Ponderosa Knickers Commuting Urban Biking Hoss Technical Gear Ponderosa Knickers Commuting Urban Biking

 
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6 Responses to “Hoss Technical Gear clothes for your commute”

  1. Fritz says:

    Chromes look better, but they’re also twice the price of those Ponderosa knickers!

    I’m with Tim on the spandex liner — I bike in them, but I’d rather have them seperate.

  2. Prescott says:

    I’m skeptical about the comfort of the short or long sleeved polos in hot weather. How thin is the material (or rather how breathable is it?). Does its looseness affect the feel?

    I commute in cotton unless it is really hot or really cold, so I’m used to being uncomfortable. I was just wondering whether making regular clothing with technical fabrics actually worked as well as using a combination of tech fabrics as well as technical design (fitted).

  3. Patrick says:

    I’d be really interested in finding out about good, casual, wicking, and reflective bicycling shirts. I’m amazed that the vast majority of bicycling clothing has no reflective material at all and if any just a little piping. Best I’ve found so far is the ELVS t-shirts from Laek House but they’re cotton and I need something that will dry out more quickly while in my gym locker at work.

    http://www.laekhouse.com/ME%20ELVS%20INFO.htm

    Please post any other good cycling shirts, especially reflective ones (or why there aren’t more in circulation)…

  4. sygyzy says:

    I am impressed with the pricing on the Hoss products. Though, at $70 for a pair of man capris and the same for a shell jacket, what does that say about the bike (clothing) industry in the first place?

  5. Jersy says:

    Cool making comfortable, functional and affordable clothes for every one . I like them .

  6. Tim says:

    I have three rancher t-shirts. I surprised you didn’t mention those. They are absolutely the bees knees. They’re loose fitting, comfortable, stylish and inexpensive. I commuted in cotton for three months before I got smart and purchased some synthetic shirts. You can get them on sale right now from jensonusa.com for 14 dollars each.

    I have another great tip. If the designer knickers seem a little pricey a good alternative is to go to your local thrift store and buy 100% polyester or 100% wool slacks. Cut them off and hem them or just roll them up. Both will wick moisture and keep you dry way better than cotton.

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