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WSJ: Commuting on two wheels

by Richard Masoner

Video from the Wall Street Journal. Many Londoners are using a greener way to get to work, especially when looking to cut costs. MarketWatch’s Kim Hjelmgaard explains why bicycling to the office is more attractive than ever.

 
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6 Responses to “WSJ: Commuting on two wheels”

  1. Roger says:

    OMG! They’re all riding on the wrong side of the road!

    ;)

  2. Nick B says:

    At the end, the video states, “Helmet hair and perspiration are the two biggest turn-offs” of cycling. Funny. Not speed, weather, or the fear of getting run over… but helmet hair. Ah vanity. Who’s going to make the first “helmet not hair” sticker for their bike?

  3. Stuart M. says:

    Hmmm, I always thought one of the benefits of bike riding was that “wind-blown” look my hair got.

  4. Diego says:

    A mayor who bikes to work! I wish L.A.’s Mayor did that! That is a great example for cities in the U.S.

  5. Isaac says:

    Hello,

    My name is Issy, I am a 6th grade student in Los Angeles.

    I am on a team competing in FIRST LEGO League, which promotes science and technology for kids. This year’s theme is Climate Connections, and our team chose to study the connections between rising temperatures and car emissions in Los Angeles. Did you know that these two things both affect each other?

    Our team needed to think of a creative solution for our topic. We found that a lot of car emissions come from people who drive a long distance to work every day, such as from Palmdale or Riverside to the downtown area. These areas have commuter trains called MetroLink, and our idea is to add a rail car for bikes only. This would encourage more people to leave the car at home, and get to work with bike and train.

    We were surprised to learn that MetroLink has room for only 2 bikes per train car. The other LA train system is a subway called Metro that travels shorter distances. Metro is adding bike lockers at some stations, but this means you have to buy two bikes if you really want to stop driving the car to work.

    In LA and other cities, train companies do not want to remove more seats to make room for bikes, because it would reduce their income. Passenger train cars are expensive and take a long time to get. So our idea is to take older rail cars that were used for something else, and make some changes to allow bike racks and ramps to get on and off. After parking your bike in this rail car you just go sit down in a regular passenger car. Adding these simple rail cars to the commuter train would not reduce income, and might even sell more tickets from all the people that could now take their bike to work.

    We made several designs of rail cars that could hold between 34 and 80 bikes. We estimate that each bikes-only rail car could reduce 408 to 960 tons of carbon dioxide emissions per year, if these commuters stopped driving 60 miles each way. This is based on 0.8 pounds of CO2 per mile driven.

    We also researched to see if other parts of the world have tried this idea. Some cities in the US are adding more room for bikes by taking out seats, but this is going slow. Some cities in Europe have taken out most or all of the seats, with people standing next to the bikes, but this was on subways and different than our topic of long distance commuters.

    If you have read all this, thank you very much, because another one of our assignments was to share our project with people who might be interested. Internet blogs are a good way for our team to try and share our work with a lot of people. Hopefully you like our idea, and please wish us luck in our competition.

    Issy

  6. Jeff says:

    While I agree with this Issy kid, his name is NOT Issy. I have seen the same comment posted at least five times on different websites relating to commuting by bicycle.

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