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Types of Fenders

by Bike Shop Girl

A mini series on Yearly Bike Fenders, today we will be discussing the different types of fenders there are and the benefits of each.

Full Coverage Fenders

One of the best systems of fenders are called full coverage as these cover up the most of your tires.  The rear fender mounts at your bottom bracket and wrapping up around your tire.  In some areas you add a buddy flap which adds distance to the fender and can even drag on the ground, keeping the spray off your buddy riding on your wheel..  Make sure you purchase the right width for your tire and frame clearance.  Purchase Full Coverage Fenders at RealCyclist.com

Clip On Fenders

The easiest way to install fenders are the clip on style.  They can be attached in the morning if its raining, or fairly quickly prior to a ride.  The downfall to this style is they aren’t full coverage.  This means it will keep the spray off your back and face but may not keep your bike and feet clean.

Other Types

There are other types of fenders, such as stubbies, fork mount, seatpost mount and such.  All these help keep the roster tail off, or the spray out of your face but to me don’t make the cut.  If you are going to rock a fender, rock it full and proud.

I’ve asked on Twitter for you guys to share your fender photos, please leave a comment or email me with the photos so we can include them with an article later this week!

Join the conversation on Twitter @BikeShopGirlcom.

 
Burley nomad 269

3 Responses to “Types of Fenders”

  1. I use full coverage fenders on my commuter and my road bike. My commuter is a rigid (even the fork) mountain bike. I am going to ride the C&O Canal trial in July and I am wondering about the muddy spots and getting the narrow space between the tires and the full coverage fenders jammed with mud. Is that a realistic worry? What do people think about the smaller style fenders for this use?

    This will be a supported multi-day ride, so I might buy a pair of smaller fenders and not open them until I see I need them. Then if I don’t use them I can just take them back to the store.

  2. Paul in Minneapolis says:

    I love SKS full fenders. They are on my heavy touring, light touring, hybird and Dutch bikes.
    They are easy to mount fender taillights on(B&M 4D toplight) and Headland mudflaps are also easy to mount, front and rear.

    Altough I did recommend them to some one who is rather carless handling the bike and she keeps knocking the fenders so the rub on the tires..

    There are others out there, but when I find something that works soooo good, I stay with it.

  3. Mark says:

    Jack,
    You may run into trouble with this. I have a Salsa Casseroll that came with 37mm wide tires, which technically exceed the limit for fender compatibility on that bike. Not realizing this, I put fenders on it anyway, and found that, while there usually weren’t any problems, in the winter, snow would often get stuck between the tire and fender, which had the potential to slow me down considerably. I’ve since switched to smaller tires, and haven’t had any such issues. If you’re worried, I’d recommend doing the same.

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