Bike Tech Shop - The Experts on Cycling with CircuitryUtility Cycling - Use Your BicycleBanjo Brothers Affordable Cycling GearCygoLite Bike Lights: Engineered to ShineChrome Bike Backpacks and Messenger BagsRideKick Electric Powered Bike TrailerOrtlieb Bike Bags & PanniersMiiR Bottles one4oneXtracycle Bike Cargo Kits, Parts and AccessoriesPlanet Bike: Better bike products for a better worldBionX: Electrify Your BikeCommuter Bike Store Breezer Greenway DX Hybrid Bike 24 Speed - 2011 Model

Velo Orange Polyvalent City Bike | Commuter Bike Photos from Renaissance Bicycles

by Bike Shop Girl

An on going series with help from our friends at Renaissance Bicycles.  These guys specialize in combining current technology with the look and feel of classic bikes.

Today’s gallery is of a Velo Orange Polyvalent City Bike. This unique city bike has a wheel size of 650b and a 1×9 setup.  Simple, easy and of course steel is real. (These are my personal words, not Renaissance Bicycles.)

From Renaissance : Before setting out to build this bike, we “imagined” what Velo Orange had in mind when designing the frameset.  We had already built the sinister alter ego — the Velo Orange Scorcher — but we wanted something true to the intentions of the frameset.  To go along with the “hot-rod” black powder coat, we envisioned lots of chrome and shiny bits, a simple drivetrain, and an elegant (yet slyly sporty) look.  Intentionally, we left off the accessories; the bike is great platform for personalization via racks, lights, chaincase, etc. We also kept cost a priority; the goal was to make available a very high quality complete city bike for $1550.

 
Burley nomad 229

4 Responses to “Velo Orange Polyvalent City Bike | Commuter Bike Photos from Renaissance Bicycles”

  1. darren says:

    I’m unclear how this is a “Rennaissance Bicycles” creation. They took a frame and most of their parts straight from Velo-Orange’s offerings, and built it. Tastefully, sure, but their narrative seems to imply they created something unique and “imaginative”, when it looks to me like they simply are acting as the intermediary builder. velo-orange.com is where the true creativity and “vision” resides, and they didn’t even merit a link in your post.

    • Darren,

      I agree and disagree with your statement. Velo Orange did invent and design the original frame, but from there it was a bare canvas. Everyone’s build, regardless of Renaissance Bikes or another person/bike shop is a creation.

  2. Kevin Love says:

    This isn’t a city bike. To be a city bike it needs the following:

    1. Internal hub gears.
    2. Internal hub brakes.
    3. Chaincase.
    4. Rear rack.
    5. Bell.
    6. Dynamo powered lights.
    7. Coatguard.
    8. Puncture-resistant tires.
    9. Integral rear wheel lock.

    David Hembrow does a much better job than I of explaining why all these things are necessary. See:

    http://hembrow.blogspot.com/2009/01/anatomy-of-reliable-everyday-bicycle.html

    With regards to the $1,550 price, I see that Curbside sells the Pashley Roadster Sovereign for $1,399. All the things that I listed come as standard factory-installed equipment on the Pashley.

    See:

    http://store.curbside.on.ca/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=216_114&products_id=129

  3. Don Grigsby says:

    FYI: I’ll have to call the “snob-alert” regarding the list of 9 items that constitute a “city bike”. Sure, all those things are nice to have; but, living here in Lund Sweden (right across the bridge from Copenhagen)the only items on that list I see on practically every bike are chain guards and a rear rack. Many bikes also have integrated rear wheel locks since this was even standard on 30 plus year old bikes and bells are required by law as well as lights if you are out at night…and yes, the police will stop you if you have no lights after dark. The other items depend on personal preference and the amount you want to pay for a bike. Here in Lund (a college town) most students ride 30n plus year old, rickety “beater bikes” that they can pick-up for under $100 bucks.
    The majority of bikes use traditional rim brake on the front and have a coaster break in the back. Newer bikes are sporting discs as well, but that’s more expensive. But basically, bikes here are simply a way to get from point A to B quickly and most bikes spend there entire “lives” outside in the elements.
    Since I will be here for a year (and I want to take home a Swedish made bike), I bought a Skeppshult “Pro” Nexus 8-speed with all those items, except of course, a skirt guard/Coat guard. Check out the following links and see what they ride here.
    http://www.skeppshult.se/
    http://www.velorbis.co.uk/
    http://www.kildemoes.dk/cykler
    http://www.centurion.dk/

Leave a Reply