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Energizer LED Safety Flasher – Coming soon to your supermarket checkout lane

by Ted Johnson

Speaking of beating the heat, I received a couple of these Energizer LED Safety Flasher lights.

Energizer LED Safety FlasherWhat does this have to do with beating the heat? The Energizer Bunny himself said:

According to an Oct. 2010 survey by Impulse Research Group, 64 percent of those who run, bike or hike while the sun is down prefer doing so specifically because they are trying to beat the heat.

(Actually I was told this by a marketing guy working on behalf of Energizer.)

I tried to find more about Impulse Research Group. I couldn’t find their own Web site, but from what I did find, they’re a market research company, and they apparently specialize in helping brands drive more impulsive decisions by consumers.

If you’re the kind of person who believes you can never have too many cheap blinky lights clipped to every available spot on your bike and body, then this is your kind of thing.

I can imagine these things in the near future hanging on hooks in the checkout lanes at grocery stores, next to the gum, gift cards, and batteries.

Yes, I’ll buy you a candy bar if you just quit whining. Oh look! Something that will keep my children safe–if it doesn’t embarrass them to death.

They’re small enough to work as clip-on earrings. Yes, I tried this. No, I did not get a photo.

I did, however, get this photo of potential cycling application for the light:

Energizer LED Safety Flasher

These blink 80 times per minute, are water resistant, and the batteries supposedly last for 50 hours.

When you see one hanging on a hook, expect it to cost about $5.99.

I threw one in my desk drawer to keep my paper clips safe. On Thursday, I’ll see if it’s still flashing.


50 Hours4/21/11 Update: The Flasher has been flashing nonstop for more than 50 hours.

 
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4 Responses to “Energizer LED Safety Flasher – Coming soon to your supermarket checkout lane”

  1. David says:

    I ride a bright yellow velomobile. I have a *HUGE* orange reflective decal on the tail end along with a tail light, brake light, amber turn signals/four way flashers and a 400 + lumen bright red flasher about 3′ off the ground pointing to the rear. I have the turn signals, running light and a Inoled Extreme in the nose along with over 800 lumens pointing off the front. I am the brightest thing on the road way night and day.

    On my tandem I run two flashers off the rear. Each is 2 3.4″ x 3 3/4″ x 3/4″. One with 36 LEDs and the other with 44 LEDs running off of a Nite Sun battery. They will go a month, night and day between charges.
    The LEDs and circuitry is set in clear epoxy. One could drive tent pegs with these lights and not hurt them.

    I find little blinky lights to be insignificant.

    There are way to many stealth cyclists out there with no lights or reflective gear.

    One can never have enough lights and or reflective gear on them selves or their bikes.

  2. jack says:

    35 degrees in Seattle this morning. April 20th. I want to go somewhere and be uncomfortably hot for 3 days. So hot all people do is complain about the heat.

    Spring? Ha!

  3. Matt says:

    Lol, research companies catering to impulsive bike commuters. I’ll take that as a positive sign. Speaking of cheap blinky lights I recently got a knog beetle light for $10 at nashbar although that does not include shipping.

  4. Tim says:

    It is much warmer when it rains. Last week was riding me crazy with the three layers that are required to commute from Seatac to Renton in Spring. Lights in the morning with rain gear and sunglasses in the afternoon. It was too warm to climb in two layers so another stop was needed to peel a layer. The wind is chore. Sometimes I look up at the light rail as I ride beneath it and wish I was onboard.

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