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Californians: A Call to Action

by Stacey Moses
Share the Road

Photo: Streetsblog Los Angeles

Californians, it is time to act. The California Bicycle Coalition and the City of Los Angeles have cosponsored a 3-foot passing bill, Senate Bill 910. Many other states have already passed similar legislation that requires automobile operators to allow a minimum of three feet when passing a cyclist from behind, and California is working to do the same. According to the CBC,

SB 910 faces a crucial vote by the full Assembly in the next few weeks – it’s one of the last votes needed for passing the bill and sending it to Gov. Jerry Brown for his signature.

I’m writing to ask you to urge your Assembly member to vote yes on SB 910 by 5 PM this Friday, Aug. 26. Maybe you’ve already contacted a legislator about SB 910 — we need another round of support messages for members of the Assembly. This what it takes to get legislation enacted!

The California Bicycle Coaltion’s goal is to encourage people to ride bikes by passing legislation that protects cyclists as they share the road. Delaware became the nineteenth state to pass a 3-foot passing bill this summer, and California hopes to be the twentieth. To find out what you can do to support the 3-foot passing bill, visit the CBC website’s safe passing page.

 
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5 Responses to “Californians: A Call to Action”

  1. Kevin Love says:

    Nice in theory, but how is it going to be enforced?

    Why do I suspect that this is just going to be another “feel good” law that won’t be enforced and therefore will provide zero benefit.

  2. Dan Connelly says:

    If a collision occurs it makes it, in theory, much easier to assign fault to the driver.

  3. Daniel says:

    I am a native Nevada and we have a expansive/expensive bike trail system along the flood wash channels including bike bridges over dirt washes and roads. When I ride all I see are homeless alcoholics using the bike bridges as a sun block. More and more people are riding bikes because of the “recover summer”. These new riders do not know the rules/etiquette or DEFENSIVE riding. A new rider jumped out in front of me on a blind corner (did not look in me face). If you want to cycle then you need to have a social security number and a thought process.
    Love COMMUTE BY BIKE.com
    Thank You

  4. Jaime Roberto says:

    I have mixed feelings about this.

    First, it’s worth noting that the proposed law has a couple of details that are left out of the summary description. 1) It applies only on highways (which I assume means what it says, but maybe it’s a legal term of art I’m unaware of). 2) It explicitly allows cars to cross a double yellow to give the cyclist room, which I think is a good thing.

    On the other hand I can see this as giving cyclists untouchable status allowing some of the less considerate to ride side by side and blocking traffic. I know it’s legal, but I don’t think it should be encouraged.

  5. BluesCat says:

    The purpose of the law is really to give a police officer a “hook,” a genuine infraction he can use to write up Dirtbag Cagers who terrorize bicyclists.

    In a posting on my own blog, I reviewed the Arizona traffic deaths of bicyclists for calendar year 2009:
    Shocking Arizona Statistics.

    The original reason for the post was to refute this fantasy that ONLY around 4% of bicyclists who are killed in traffic accidents are struck from behind, it’s actually closer to 40%! But a side revelation is how difficult it is determining whether it was the driver or the cyclist who was at fault.

    In a confrontation between a bike and a car which results in a fatality, it isn’t hard to guess who dies. A lot of times there are no other witnesses, and since the dead don’t testify, and a driver will hardly say anything to accept blame if he or she has KILLED someone, it also isn’t hard to guess who “gets the blame.”

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