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Fyxation’s Gates Pedals and Straps

by Vanessa Marie Robinson

Vanessa Marie RobinsonVanessa Marie Robinson is a Brooklyn-based industrial designer who’s blog For The Love Of Bikes covers her multifaceted interests in all things cycling. She is typically found either riding in the city on a single-speed or training upstate on her road bike — year-round!


I’ve actually been eying Fyxation’s wide and nubby Gates Pedals for a while now so I was excited to test them out along with their Gates Pedal Straps for Commute by Bike. Back in November, I swapped out my old Shimano 105 pedals with integrated cages on my commuter and gave them a go.

Pros

Fyxation's Gates Pedals and Straps

Fyxation’s pedals are molded from a ‘high impact nylon body’ and come in seven different colors. Each side of the pedal is identical and has lots of little nubs which create a grippy texture. I rode in a few different pairs of boots and shoes and found them to be great — the softer the shoe’s soles the better since, after all, they also had BMX riders in mind when designing them.

I wasn’t used to such wide platforms but quickly enjoyed the convenience of them in the unpredictable conditions city riding/commuting offers making them very versatile.

I also rode Fyxation’s pedals with their Gates Pedal Straps (in white). The straps provide an enormous amount of control akin to clipless pedals by helping to keep your foot in place and increase power on your upstroke.

Fyxation's Gates Pedals and StrapsThe straps are made of two-inch seat belt webbing and uses incredibly strong Velcro™ which has been reliable in my weeks of testing. The wide straps helped create a snug connection with the pedals and it was nice to notice that they never left any scratches or marks on even some of my nicer shoes. I also found that the thickness of both the Velcro™ and webbing made them keep their form over time – so your shoe fits in like a glove.

Cons

Fyxation’s Gates Pedal Straps are similar to others on the market, yet were designed with longer straps to accommodate a wider variety of (large) shoes widths. While this is totally a great thing, being a woman (who wears a size 7) I found myself wishing that the straps could be tightened even more, but the thickness of the Velcro™ wouldn’t allow for it. Note that this was not the case with all my shoes but with ones that are thin soled.

One feature I wish the Gates Pedal incorporated when using them with the straps was some kind of detail (like a thin lip or larger nubs) on the opposite edge of the pedals to help your launching foot flip over the pedal to slip into the strap. I did occasionally found myself having an issue with flipping over such large pedals in certain shoes — though I don’t think you’d have this issue in any soft-soled sneaker.

Fyxation's Gates Pedals and Straps

The straps come in both white and black and while I am partial to white accessories a few weeks of riding in all conditions made the black version way more appealing.

All in all Fyxation’s Gates Pedals and Straps have been super practical and great for city riding.

 
Burley nomad 229

9 Responses to “Fyxation’s Gates Pedals and Straps”

  1. John says:

    I’ve always had a question concerning straps: is it easy to get your feet out of them in case of an emergency stop? I’m sometimes tempted to buy some to benefit from the advantages you describe here (better traction), but I’m afraid of falling if I can’t withdraw my feet fast enough when stopping the bike.

    • Ted Johnson says:

      John: My experience with toe clips is that I’ve learned an instinct of quickly pulling my foot out backwards before putting my foot down. It’s second nature to me now — and I didn’t ever have to fall down to learn this instinct.

      These straps are not exactly the same thing as toe clips, but my guess is that the same principle applies.

      Vanessa?

  2. Matt Waters says:

    I’ll have to ditto John with that question. But more than just getting them out fast for those planned stops it’s the sudden un-planned stops that concerns me the most. Another concern I have comes about from the very reason I have considered trying this type of pedal. I have limited dexterity & movement in my left foot and knee. This routinely causes my foot to slip from the pedal. When Vanessa mentioned about having an issue with flipping over such large pedals in certain shoes I realized this would be an issue for me regardless of my shoes.

    Thanks for the Pros & the Cons.

  3. Vanessa says:

    John and Matt,

    I gain much more control when I’m clipped in (though good quick response brakes also are a big help stopping suddenly).

    In regards to Fykation’s pedal straps, you can always choose to use the other (none strap) side of the pedal. If you’re concerned about getting your foot in and out, you could start off using one — on the opposite side of your launch foot to see the difference.

    Matt, especially if you’re having issues of having your foot slip off pedals – these may be the trick in allowing you to feel much more connected. You can also adjust the velcro so your foot have a larger/looser opening for your shoe to get used to it.

    Straps or cages are much easier to get used to and you can pretty much wear any type of shoe with them — vs. most clip systems like LOOK or SPDs which require a shoe with the cleats. In my opinion, for city cycling, straps are overall much more practical — though when I’m riding for more then an hour at a time I opt for my SPDs (and always LOOKs on my road bike).

    Hope this helps!

  4. BluesCat says:

    Count me in as one who likes the option of either being clipped in or not clipped in. To that end, my main commuting bike has Shimano A520 SPD single-sided pedals. One side is a platform, the other side side has the SPD clips.

    If I take the early morning route to work, when there is no traffic and I can feel safe on roads with 40 mph speed limits, I’ll clip in so I can spin up to 20 mph or better on the empty major arterials.

    When I’m heading home in the afternoon, and I’m forced to share the road with impatient commuters commanding two ton metal boxes, and I retreat to the stop-and-go routes of parking lots and neighborhood streets, I’ll just use the platform side of the pedals to avoid any Arte Johnsons.

    Like Vanessa said, you can essentially do the same thing with these Fyxation pedals.

  5. Matt says:

    hmm… cool pedals and all but I priced them on their website at 20 for the pedals and another 44 for the straps. I would just get a set of power grips, they are not as easily adjustable but you can get em for around 20 which is way cheaper and they do the same thing.

  6. Scott says:

    Will have to chime in with Matt $64.00 is way too much in my opinion. I have been using Power Grips now for over 2 years with about 5 months of daily commuting. Can be a bit difficult to get certain shoes IN, would be the case with anything non-clip other than a plain platform. My proven plan has been to wear an older pair of Keen with the Keen Dri fabric. Unless it’s pouring rain my feet are dry and the fabric has prevented me from having to move to any type of boot due to cold weather wind ( Power Grips does have extended length straps for winter boot users). Thanks Vanessa for giving us an honest review of another option!

  7. Julie H. says:

    I love these fyxation pedals. I have them in hot pink. I just figured out how to put the velcro pedal straps on and can’t wait to use them.

    I do fear for their lilly white lives*

  8. plh says:

    Thank you for posting this. I am basically a commuter and utility cyclist. It’s good to know there are these kinds of options. I have avoided clipping because of my concern with being connected to my bike during a (thankfully very rare) crash. My other concern is having to mess with special footwear. This would take care of the latter and, to some extent, the former.
    I am out in all weather so I guess I would get black or some other dark color. If I got white or some light color it would soon BECOME dark!

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